Conférence Internationale de RdR 2017 – Appel à communication

Guide to Submitting an Abstract

These easy-to-follow steps are aimed as a guide in a bid to help maximise and amplify key points, information and outcomes. We hope this information will help; alternatively, email us (conference[at]hri[dot]global) if you have any further questions.

Please remember that the call for abstracts closes at 23:59 UK time (UTC+1) on 21 October 2016.

Writing the Abstract

STEP 1 – DECIDE ON A TITLE

Choose a simple and descriptive title. It should include the idea or the result of the study, project, intervention or campaign (what you learned), the experiment itself (what you did) and the setting (where it happened). The title must not be too long, but it is important that you include such things as who, what, when, where and how.

STEP 2 – CHOOSE A FORMAT

Although there is no set format for an abstract, you may wish to follow one of the three offered below in order to help structure and communicate your ideas effectively:

Guide to Submitting an Abstract Table

Dos and Don’ts

DO:

Avoid statements such as ‘work in progress’ or ‘results will be discussed’
Ensure that the abstract is easy to read and understandable for the reviewer
Avoid acronyms and slang where possible
Speak of something new or innovative
Make sure your topic is important for a variety of audiences
Indicate the correct abstract type and follow the structure
Try and limit your presentation to address one or two key ideas only

DON’T:

Submit an abstract that does not offer anything new
Submit an abstract that does not meet structural requirements
Include preliminary data and inaccurate facts
Submit an abstract important to a narrow audience only
Use unclear language or bulky sentences
Exceed 300 words

Here is an Example of an Effective Abstract

TYPE: Oral
TRACK: Practice
AUTHORS: Mr Joe Bloggs
TITLE: Mothers helping mothers: Innovative role for families in harm reduction, China
ABSTRACT:
——
Issue –
One of the major approaches to dealing with injecting drug users (IDUs) in China has been detoxification/rehabilitation centres. Upon leaving these centres, most IDUs return to a community that does not readily welcome or accept them. Problems with reintegration into the community combined with distrust from their own families can push former drug users to socialize with their former IDU friends and return to injecting and sharing needles.

Setting –
Gejiu City is a major route for drug trafficking in Yunnan Province, China. In 2008, the HIV prevalence among IDUs in Gejiu was 68.5%.

Project –
With funding support from USAID, FHI/China in late 2006 pioneered a new approach: the ‘Mother Helping Mothers’ intervention implemented by the Green Garden IDU project in Gejiu. Two volunteer mothers joined the project to help their own children and to change other parents’ attitudes toward IDU interventions. Many IDUs’ families initially ignored the volunteer mothers’ home visits, until the mothers invited them to participate in drop-in centre activities intended to help poor IDU families. These efforts changed attitudes, and more IDUs and their parents began to become involved in activities organised by the mothers on HIV prevention, care and support; harm reduction and MMT promotion; home visits for IDU families; stigma and discrimination reduction activities for community members; and job searching for former drug users.

Outcome –
Between September 2009 and October 2012, the ‘Mother Helping Mothers’ intervention reached 318 IDUs through home visits, and 1,612 community members. An IDU survey in Gejiu in 2010 revealed that IDUs who received home visits reported decreased needle sharing (87.7% never shared needles, 23.1% shared in the past 6 months, and 18.8% in the past month). This model can be an innovative approach to harm reduction in Asian cultures where family ties are strong.
——

STEP 3 – SEEK FEEDBACK

Once you have written your abstract, show it to some of your colleagues, and also to some family or friends outside of the field to see if they can understand it easily. Correcting mistakes at this stage gives your abstract a better chance of being accepted.

STEP 4 – SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT

Once you have written and checked your abstract, you can submit it online through the HR17 registration system here.

The deadline for abstract submissions is Friday 21 October 2016, but we strongly urge you to submit your work well before this deadline and not to leave it until the last moment. The deadline will not be extended.

What Happens Next?

Once you have submitted your abstract you will receive an email to confirm that your abstract has been received. By 13 January 2017, you will be notified whether your abstract has been successful or not.

We wish you success with your abstract writing!

For further information, please visit our conference page or contact the conference team (conference[at]hri[dot]global).

  • ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY FRIDAY 21 OCTOBER 2016
  • ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE
  • ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE NO MORE THAN 300 WORDS AND IN ENGLISH

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *